Reviews

2015 Chrysler 300 Walk Around


The 2015 Chrysler 300 looks cleaner and more modern compared with the 2014 model, with revised styling that brings it more in line with the smaller Chrysler 200 for increased visual brand continuity. Most noticeably, the imposing, mesh front grille is 33 percent larger than the outgoing model and features the Chrysler wing logo floating in the middle. It’s flanked by new headlamps that include LED daytime running lights. The redesigned front-end also gets new LED fog lamps. The sportier S model gets a black chrome mesh grille, as well as black headlamp surrounds.

The side view of the Chrysler 300 hasn’t changed much for 2015. Large, highly sculpted wheel arches anchor each end of the car, with a high character line that runs straight from the front wheel over the door handles and into the tail lights. Wheel sizes and designs vary depending on trim level and equipment, ranging from 18-inch alloys to 20-inch black aluminum wheels. The 300S is distinguished by its aggressive side sills.

From the rear, the Chrysler 300 looks wide and substantial. For 2015, new LED tail lamps, which resemble those on the Chrysler 200, feature a bright ring around the perimeter. The rear of the 300 has a slightly lifted look. 300S V8 models get a decklid spoiler. New twin integrated exhaust tips have a more horizontal shape for 2015, replacing the round tips used on the 2014 model.

Interior

The interior of the 2015 Chrysler 300 is the best yet. Interior designers say they wanted the cabin to be a place of contrasts, between old-world styling and the latest technology. They seemed to have achieved their aim, with a cabin that uses classic and tasteful color combinations, large color displays and many connectivity features.

For 2015, Chrysler 300 comes with an 8-speed automatic transmission controlled by a rotary knob instead of the traditional gear shifter used on the 2014 model. The knob is easy to use and opens up more space in the cabin, creating an airy feeling between driver and passenger. 2015 Chrysler 300S and Platinum models get steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters.

Fit, finish and materials are some of the best in the class, beating the Ford Taurus, which, generally speaking, has grown long in the tooth. We find the Chrysler 300’s design even more tasteful than that of the Chevrolet Impala, which is greatly improved over its previous generation. Chrysler 300 Limited models get upscale features like dual-zone climate control, leather trim and a glossy wood trim finish.

300C Platinum models are the most luxurious, with gorgeous, hand-sanded matte wood accents and leather trim crafted by Poltrona Frau, the Italian furniture company that also upholsters exotic cars, including the latest Porsche Panamera Exclusive edition.

300S interiors get unique seats and interior trim, though we found them more spartan and noticeably less luxurious than their C and Platinum counterparts.

All Chrysler 300 models feature a color touch screen for the center stack that uses Chrysler’s Uconnect interface. We find the Chrysler Uconnect system more user-friendly than My Ford Touch, though we prefer the menus and layout of Chevrolet MyLink, which uses capacitive touch and includes a locking storage compartment behind the screen. To keep with the old-world tradition, the Chrysler 300 features an analog clock atop its display.

On the instrument cluster, a new digital TFT display sits between the analog speedometer and tachometer, showing speed, navigation instructions, vehicle information and more. While the display is large and easy to read, the trip odometer and speed displays are on separate screens, preventing the driver from seeing both at once.

Seats are roomy, comfortable and well cushioned, good for freeway cruising and road trips. Heated, power front seats are standard, and ventilated front seats come on 300C and Platinum models.

Rear seats have plenty of leg- and headroom, on-par with the class. Two USB ports in the rear of the center console let rear passengers charge their phones and other devices. Cargo space for the Chrysler 300 measures 16.3 cubic feet, less than both the Chevrolet Impala and Ford Taurus, though the standard 60/40-split folding rear seats make it possible to carry more if needed.

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